Why street stalls could no longer be allowed in these 12 city centre sites

By Hull Daily Mail | Posted: 10 Oct 2017

Permanent street stalls could be banned from most of the new-look pedestrian routes in the city centre.

Under a proposed new council licensing policy on street trading, a dozen areas have been identified as "unsuitable" for stalls selling goods all year round.

They include a number of public squares as well as several streets in the Fruit Market area.

Ken and Lee O'Grady who ran a phone stall for 13 years in Queen Victoria Square before being forced to move because of 2017 City of Culture events

Most are areas which were upgraded last year as part of the city council's £25m public realm programme in preparation for Hull's year as the UK City of Culture.

The streets include:

* Paragon Square

* King Edward Square

* Queen Victoria Square

* Trinity Square

* Whitefriargate

* Princes Dock Street

* Humber Dock Street

* Nelson Street

* Queen's Gardens

* The Rose Bowl

Under the plans, licences will not be granted to street traders looking to open permanent outdoor stalls or food vans in streets in those areas.

However, licence applications for one-off events - such as festivals - will still be considered.

This year's Yum Festival was held in and around Queens Gardens

The new policy, which is expected to come into force next January, identifies just four "preferable" areas where permanent street trading licences will be considered.

They are in South Street, King Edward Street, part of Jameson Street and outside the main entrance to Paragon Station.

Boxer Tommy Coyle with his father Chris at the family's fruit and veg stall in King Edward Street

That means Chris Coyle's long-established fruit and veg stall in King Edward Street will be able to stay on its traditional pitch.

He recently had his licence renewed for the site until the end of January.

Nick Wright will also be able to continue serving up pancakes from his mobile unit in Jameson Street under the proposed new policy, having also recently had his street trading licence renewed until January 31.

Nick Wright (left) from Go Dutch Pancakes

But it's bad news for Ken and Lee O'Grady, who ran a phone stall in Queen Victoria Square for 13 years until last year.

Earlier this year, they were blocked from returning to there because of restrictions around the Weeping Window poppy installation at the Maritime Museum.

A new council report on the issue says: "This policy seeks to support the council's city centre public spaces strategy in ensuring that the street trading on offer is of a good quality which adds to the city centre, potentially offering goods not readily available from shops and that the trading units adds positively to the character and ambience of the street.

"Street traders can add considerably to the vibrancy of the city centre and are welcomed and encouraged.

"There is a desire to move towards a concentration of locations which would allow for enhanced clustering or zoning of street traders, thus creating a 'street market' feel and more of a destination in its own right."

Speaking at a licensing committee, Councillor Karen Mathieson said she was worried other traders classed as peddlers could still end up selling goods in stall-free zones because they were licensed separately by the police.

"These people just pop up, selling things like fidget-spinners, and disappear again.

"If we are trying to keep some areas clear of street traders, they shouldn't be allowed in the same areas. It just doesn't sit right with me."

Legal officer Stephen Turner said the council would only take enforcement action against peddlers if they were not carrying any formal authorisation from the police.



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